archives

Archive for

New Report Series on Demographics… First Up: Diversity

By Shawn Hoch, Data Analyst, The Polis Center at IUPUI

2010 Diversity Index

In 2008 IUPUI announced the appointment of Dr. Kenneth Durgan as Chancellor for Diversity, followed by the creation of the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion.  One of the responsibilities of the office is to measure and report how historically underrepresented groups fare in the faculty and student communities. This push by the university is an example of how the issue of diversity is increasing in priority on many levels of public life.  More people are catching on to the ideas of making direct efforts to include diverse groups in a place or organization and celebrating the different voices represented.

When measuring racial/ethnic diversity of a population, we usually use a demographic snapshot such as a pie chart showing proportions of each group represented.  Our new report, the first in a series on demographics, offers a few more ways to look at diversity and how it has changed over the past two decades.  Focusing on Marion County, Indiana, we drill down to the neighborhood level so we have a clear picture of how the numbers vary across the area.  We use the Diversity Index to easily visualize where the balance between racial and ethnic groups is more even or uneven.  We also use historical snapshots over a 20-year period showing how the footprint of high minority areas has changed and how diversity (using the index) has changed.  For those of you with connections to Marion County, we think the report will help you get to know the city.  Everyone interested in diversity should check it out, especially if you’re looking for new ways to think about demographic changes in your community.  Let us know if our report includes your ideas of diversity, and if not, how you would describe the subject?

Advertisements

Categories

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow me on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: